Loading...
play.thalwyrn.com
Click to copy IP
Loading...
discord.thalwyrn.com
Click to join
Avatar
Welcome to Thalwyrn!
To join our community, please login or register!
Internet Explorer: Internet Explorer is not supported. Please upgrade to a more modern browser.

Builder information


Welcome to the Minecraft Builder's Wiki, a comprehensive guide for all aspiring builders in the Minecraft community! This wiki page includes a variety of topics such as important commands, building ideas, and much more, all designed to help you become a better builder in Minecraft. Whether you are a beginner or a seasoned builder, this wiki is the perfect resource to help you take your building skills to the next level.


WorldEdit is a powerful plugin for Minecraft that is designed to help players quickly and easily edit their worlds. With WorldEdit, players can use a variety of commands to manipulate blocks, create structures, and customize their Minecraft experience in a variety of ways.Β 

One of the most useful features of WorldEdit is its ability to help players quickly and easily manipulate large areas of blocks. This can be accomplished using the //wand command, which provides players with a special tool that allows them to select a specific area of blocks. Once a specific area has been selected, players can then use a variety of other commands to edit and manipulate the blocks in various ways. For example, players can use the //set command to change all the blocks in the selected area to a specific type, or the //replace command to replace one type of block with another. If you're new to WorldEdit, the variety of commands can seem overwhelming. Don't worry; the next part of this wiki-page will explain all the commands in simple terms, so you can start using WorldEdit with ease.


Simple Commands:


//wand - Gives the player a wand that they can use to select blocks and regions.

Left click (hit) with the axe to mark the first position. Right click (interact) with the block to mark the second position.


//pos1 and //pos2 - These commands are used in conjunction with the wand to set the first and second points of a selection. To set the first point, stand where you want the first corner of the selection to be, and type //pos1. To set the second point, stand where you want the opposite corner of the selection to be, and type //pos2.

//pos1 <x> <y> <z>
//pos2 <x> <y> <z>
The "x", "y", and "z" parameters specify the coordinates of the first and second positions. 
For example, to set the first position of a selection to (0, 64, 0) and the second position
to (10, 70, 10), you would type:

//pos1 0 64 0
//pos2 10 70 10
You can also just stand in the position and mark the point 
you are located at by only doing //pos1 and //pos2

//set - This command is followed by the block type you want to set. For example, to set all blocks in the selection to stone, type //set stone.

//set <block> [data]
The "block" parameter specifies the block type to set, and the "data" parameter specifies the block data value (optional). 
For example, to set all blocks in a selection to oak wood planks, you would type:

//set oak_planks

//replace - This command is followed by two block types: the first is the block you want to replace, and the second is the block you want to replace it with. For example, to replace all instances of dirt with grass, type //replace dirt grass.

//replace <from> <to> [data]
The "from" parameter specifies the block type to replace, and the "to" parameter specifies the block type to replace it with. 
The "data" parameter specifies the block data value (optional). 
For example, to replace all stone blocks in a selection with cobblestone blocks, you would type:

//replace stone cobblestone

//copy and //paste - These commands do not require any additional parameters. Use the wand to select the region you want to copy, and type //copy. Then, move to the location where you want to paste the selection, and type //paste.

//copy
//paste
The //copy command saves the blocks in the selection to your clipboard, and the //paste command pastes the clipboard contents at your current location.
For example, to copy a selection and paste it 10 blocks to the east of your current location, you would type:

//copy
//paste east 10

//undo & //redo - This command does not require any additional parameters. Simply type //undo or //redo to undo/redo the last WorldEdit command that was used.

//undo [steps]
//redo [steps]
The "steps" parameter specifies how many commands to undo or redo (defaults to 1). 
For example, to undo the last 5 WorldEdit commands, you would type:

//undo 5

//pos - This command does not require any additional parameters. Simply type //pos to display your current position in the world.


//rotate - Β This command is followed by the number of degrees you want to rotate the selection by. For example, to rotate the selection 90 degrees clockwise, type //rotate 90.

//rotate <yaw> [pitch]
to rotate a selection 90 degrees clockwise, you would type:

//rotate 90

//flip - This command flips the selected region along a certain axis. Use //flip x to flip the selection along the x-axis, //flip y to flip along the y-axis, and //flip z to flip along the z-axis.

//flip [directions]
The "directions" parameter specifies which axes to flip along (defaults to all axes). 
For example, to flip a selection horizontally, you would type:

//flip h

//hollow - This command is followed by the block type you want to use for the outer walls of the selection. For example, to hollow out a selection using glass blocks, type //hollow glass.

//hollow <thickness>
The "thickness" parameter specifies the thickness of the outer walls (defaults to 1). 
For example, to hollow out a selection with a wall thickness of 2 blocks, you would type:

//hollow 2

//walls - This command is followed by the block type you want to use for the outer walls of the selection. For example, to create a wall of obsidian blocks around a selection, type //walls obsidian.

//walls <block> [data]
The "block" parameter specifies the block type to use for the walls, and the "data" parameter specifies the block data value (optional). 
For example, to create stone walls around the perimeter of a selection, you would type:

//walls stone

//expand and //contract - These commands are followed by the direction you want to expand or contract the selection in, and the number of blocks you want to expand or contract it by. For example, to expand the selection up by two blocks, type //expand up 2.

//expand <amount> [directions]
//contract <amount> [directions]
The "amount" parameter specifies the number of blocks to expand or contract the selection by.
The "directions" parameter specifies which directions to expand or contract in (defaults to all directions). 
For example, to expand a selection 5 blocks to the east and west, you would type:

//expand 5 ew

//shift - This command is followed by the direction you want to move the selection in, and the number of blocks you want to move it by. For example, to move the selection up by one block, type //shift up 1.


//sphere and //cylinder - These commands are followed by the block type you want to use for the sphere or cylinder, the radius of the sphere or cylinder, and in the case of //cylinder, the height of the cylinder. For example, to create a sphere of diamond blocks with a radius of 10 blocks, type //sphere diamond 10. To create a cylinder of stone blocks with a radius of 5 blocks and a height of 10 blocks, type //cylinder stone 5 10.

//sphere <block> [radius]
//cylinder <block> [radius] [height]
The "block" parameter specifies the block type to use for the shape, and the "radius" and "height" parameters specify the size of the shape (optional). 
For example, to create a stone sphere with a radius of 5 blocks, you would type:
//sphere stone 5

//regen - This command does not require any additional parameters. Simply type //regen to regenerate the selected region.


//mask - This command is followed by the block type you want to use as the mask. For example, to select all dirt blocks that are adjacent to stone blocks, type //mask stone and then use another WorldEdit command such as //set to modify those dirt blocks.

//mask <block>
The "block" parameter specifies the block type to use as the mask. Only blocks that match the mask will be affected by certain WorldEdit commands. 
For example, to set a mask of stone, you would type:

//mask stone

//setbiome - This command is followed by the biome you want to set. For example, to set the biome of a selection to desert, type //setbiome desert.

//setbiome <biome>
The "biome" parameter specifies the biome to set. For example, to set the biome of a selection to "desert", you would type:

//setbiome desert

//snow - This command covers the selected region with a layer of snow.

//snow [depth] 
The "depth" parameter specifies how many layers of snow blocks you want to add. 
For example, to add 2 layers of snow blocks to a selection, you would type:

//snow 2

//thaw - This command removes all snow and ice from the selected region.

/thaw [size] [height]

[size] is the radius of the cylinder to thaw in
[height] is the height of the cylinder to thaw in

//fill - This command fills the selected region with a specific block type. For example, //fill stone will fill the selection with stone.

//fill <block> [data] [replace]
The "block" parameter specifies the block type to fill the selection with, and the "data" parameter specifies the block data value (optional). 
The "replace" parameter specifies whether to replace existing blocks in the selection with the new block type or not (defaults to true). 
For example, to fill a selection with stone blocks, you would type:

//fill stone

//outline - This command creates an outline of the selected region.

//outline <block> [data]
The "block" parameter specifies the block type to use for the outline, and the "data" parameter specifies the block data value (optional). 
For example, to create an outline around a selection with oak wood planks, you would type:

//outline oak_planks

//overlay - This command creates an overlay on top of the selected region.

//overlay <block> [data]
The "block" parameter specifies the block type to use for the overlay, and the "data" parameter specifies the block data value (optional). 
For example, to place a layer of snow blocks on top of the existing blocks in a selection, you would type:

//overlay snow

//center - This command moves the selected region so that its center is at the player's current position.

//center [x] [y] [z]
The "x", "y", and "z" parameters specify the coordinates of the new center point. 
For example, to move the center of a selection to the coordinates (50, 64, 50), you would type:

//center 50 64 50

//contract - This command shrinks the selected region by a specified number of blocks on each side

//contract [amount]
The "amount" parameter specifies how many blocks to contract the selection by (defaults to 1). 
For example, to contract a selection by 3 blocks on each side, you would type:

//contract 3

Β 

Β 

Β 


224